Alan Hitchcox

Alan
L.
Hitchcox
Editor,
Penton Media Inc.

Alan became a technical editor in 1981 and joined Hydraulics & Pneumatics in 1987. After serving in the US Army as a wheeled vehicle mechanic, he graduated with a BS in engineering technology from Franklin University, Columbus, Ohio, while working as an industiral service coordinator and project manager at an industrial distributor. He has taken technical courses in fluid power and electronic and digital control at the Milwaukee School of Engineering and the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee and has served on several industry committees.

Articles
Harvester puts hydraulics to work

When is a harvester more than a harvester? When it also separates the grapes from their stems and sorts the grapes. A trimming tool can also be used to prune the vines. Such is the case with grape harvesters from Pellenc SA, Pertuis, France. Pellenc manufactures multiple lines of harvester trimmers, and other equipment for owners and operators of vineyards. Pellenc’s machines are designed for maximum crop yield by taking advantage of closed-loop electrohydraulic control for propulsion, harvesting, and cleaning.

Progress for women in engineering
Editor Alan Hitchcox discusses the progress women have made in engineering, especially in management roles.
Cylindrical reservoir breaks from convention

The Cyclone reservoir has a cylindrical shape, and was originally developed and patented for use in hydraulic fan drives for mobile equipment by Price Engineering, Hartland, Wis. Now available for general application, officials at Price Engineering say the Cyclone reservoir reduces fluid volume and associated costs up to 95%.

Hydraulics gives multi-articulated excavator wide range of motions

Menzi Muck AG, Widnau, Switzerland, makes all-terrain excavators that allow each leg or wheel to be raised, lowered, extended, retracted, or moved in or spread out so the operator can adjust the working base of the machine to conform to the terrain. This control provides extreme maneuverability and remarkable flexibility, stability, and safe operation.

Rock star of digging

Digga dubs itself Australia’s premier attachment manufacturer. But these aren’t just empty words. Established in 1981, Digga pioneered pendulum drilling in Australia and is Australia’s leading manufacturer of planetary drive boring and trenching attachments for construction and other heavy industries. Digga offers more than 80 different attachments, an extensive line of replacement parts, and service.

Hydraulics runs dredger 24/7
Powerful hydraulic drives keep waterways clear by pulling debris from the water and transporting it miles away.
Clutches go through the gears
Hydraulic drives often are combined with gearing to provide the best combination of output speed and torque for maximum efficiency, performance, and controllability. But sometimes hydraulic actuators are best used when they are integrated into a gear drive. Hydraulically actuated clutches, for example, can be used within a gearbox to engage and disengage different sets of gears to provide different output speeds and torques.
Machine builder goes nuts with hydraulics
When you have to tighten a nut on a stud that's more than 2 ft in diameter, you don't use a wrench, you use hydraulics.
Hydraulic hose carried to great lengths

Hydraulics moves the ramps and platforms that allow a single carrier to hold multiple cars. Naturally, heavy loads are involved, and the hose must tolerate brutal over-the-road conditions. Typically, car carriers have relied on SAE 100R1 hydraulic hose for pressures to 2250 psi for 3⁄8-in. hose (to 2000 psi for 1⁄2-in. hose) and SAE 100R2 for pressures to 4000 psi for 3⁄8-in. hose (3500 for 1⁄2-in. hose). However, the pressure rating for one manufacturer’s proprietary hydraulic hose is 2750 psi for the  3⁄8-in.

I’ve been to hose hell and back 1
Alan Hitchcox
editor
Hydraulics keeps track boom on even ground

New Genie S-40 Trax and S-45 Trax telescopic booms, from Terex Aerial Work Platforms, Redmond, Wash., are now available with the company’s four-point Trax track drive system. By using four triangular track drives instead of wheels, the machines are better equipped to tackle uneven terrain, especially under a wide variety of soil conditions. And unlike full-length track drives on skid-steer machines, the triangular track drives cause less damage to sensitive ground surfaces, making the S-40 and S-45 able to take on almost any surface.

Simulation table produces more realistic testing
Exova Group Ltd. provides demanding, laboratory-based testing and related advisory services for a broad range of products and processes. Test results ensure a customer’s compliance with safety and quality standards. Steve Panter, operation manager of global automotive testing at Exova, purchased a hydraulic simulation table last year from Moog Inc., East Aurora, N. Y. Hydraulic cylinders make the simulation table more effective by testing six degrees of motion in a small footprint.
Stuff that sticks in your mind
Editor Alan Hitchcox remembers the life lesson he learned in an engineering economics course about the dangers of multi-tasking instead of finishing a project and then moving to the next one.
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