Smaller sensors from MTS offer more precise control

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Last week, MTS Systems Corp., Sensors Div., announced that it has created a new initiative to help improve control and safety in mobile machinery with its compact model MS sensor. These sensors are small enough to fit into machinery components like steering systems, blade deck lifters, and others. In steering systems, for example, the sensors could enable GPS positioning of machinery.

“The need for greater, more precise control across almost every component of modern construction,  agricultural and mining vehicles is driving a market for smart cylinders that can fit in the tightest possible spaces,” said Haubold “Hub” vom Berg, technical marketing manager for mobile hydraulics at MTS Sensors. “MTS Sensors offers a wide range of small to medium sized magnetostrictive sensors that meet those needs.”

The Temposonics Model MS sensor has a diameter of 28 mm, operates over a temperature range of -40 to 221°F, and comes standard with a cable connection that is compatible with typical mobile equipment electrical connector requirements. It generates an analog signal, which provides accurate and reliable cylinder position feedback for the life of the hydraulic cylinder. Rated for up to 100 g of shock and 15 g of vibration, it also features 100 V/m EMI protection and provides a measuring range of 50 to 2000 mm (1.97 to 78.7 in.).

Visit MTS for more details.

 

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